STEM Scholarship

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BUILDING OUR LEGACY

LEADING THE WAY IN EDUCATION - In the spirit and name of BWOPA's charter member, The Victoria Redus Scholarship Fund supports young emerging Black women on their academic journey who have an interest in (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) STEM related fields.

BWOPA understands the importance of investing in our future.  Recent employment data indicates an extreme shortage of black women employed in STEM fields.  Thus, BWOPA's educational strategy to support young, college going African American women inevitably benefits the economic vitality of the black community in a major way. 

Our aim is to lead the way in providing African American Women access and opportunities to STEM related fields while strengthening our leadership pipeline for equality and equity for all.  It's our time to level the playing field. 

Contribute today to support BWOPA as we lead the way to building our legacy of power, civic participation and equity for all. 

Our goal is to raise $25,000 to provide scholarships to up to eight (8) young African American women.  At least one from within the BWOPA chapter areas who on their way to college/university with a focus study in STEM. 

We hope that you will choose to support our mission.  Your tax-deductible contribution, large or small, will make a difference.  Can we count of your contribution to support our next generation of leaders -- $50, $100, $250, $500, $1,000?

CLICK HERE to help our emerging STEM leaders of tomorrow.  Donate Today!


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Ms. Victoria, affectionately known as "Queen Victoria" served as Professor of Mathematics at Laney College for over 30 years.  Ms. Redus was a charter member of BWOPA and served as the Scholarship Committee Chair.  She was an avid traveler who visited every country except Antarctica.  In Victoria's honor and in her memory, we are proud to offer this scholarship in her name.

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100+ Black Women Running for Office

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CLICK HERE 

View "100+ Black Women Running for Office in 2018"

It is important that we start following the lead of Black women, and it is more and more clear why. Here is a list of Black women who are running for office across the United States.

Celebrating 50 years in 2018, BWOPA is excited to have started the movement in support of Black women in politics with its 12 founding members - Alfreda Abbott, Margaret Amoureaux, Belva Davis, Ruth Hagwood-Webb, Aileen Hernandez, Ella Hill Hutch, Mary Jane Johnson, Dorothy Pitts, Teola Sanders, Frances Taylor and Dezie Woods-Jones.

 

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London Breed

Condolences to Mayor Ed Lee's family, San Francisco and support to our sister Acting Mayor London Breed

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San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee passed away early this morning after suffering an apparent heart attack while grocery shopping late Monday night. He was 65, and is survived by his wife, Anita, and two daughters, Brianna and Tania.

Lee was in his second term in office as the city’s 43rd mayor, a role he was initially reluctant to take on when appointed to the job after Mayor Gavin Newsom became the state’s lieutenant governor. Lee took the job after a campaign by Chinese-American civic leaders who were eager to see the first Chinese American hold the position. During his tenure, Lee helped oversee San Francisco’s continued role as a center of tech and innovation.

Now, Board of Supervisors President London Breed is serving as acting mayor. According to the SF Gate, the Board of Supervisors will either vote to keep Breed as the temporary mayor, or they could choose another candidate. If a majority of supervisors cannot agree on a candidate, Breed would remain in the office until the June 2018 election. Per the Gate, though, it is likely that Breed will keep the post.

Here are four things to know about San Francisco’s current acting mayor:

  • She is the first black woman to hold the post.
  • She is a lifelong resident of the city. She grew up with her grandmother in the city’s housing projects and public housing has been an important part and particular focus of her political career. She got her start in politics working as an intern for the Office of Housing and Neighborhood Services under former Mayor Willie Brown.
  • She is known to be very frank, which has ruffled feathers in the past. 
  • Breed may have been preparing for the position, as it’s widely believed she was planning a mayoral run when Lee’s second term expired in two years. She is well qualified for the job. She earned a bachelor’s degree at UC Davis and received her master’s degree in public administration at the University of San Francisco. Breed was elected as city supervisor in 2012 and became board president in 2015.

 

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2018 BWOPA Turns 50!

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BWOPA TURNS 50

Stay tuned for our 2018 calendar of celebratory events!

Founded in 1968 by 12 politically active women from various Bay Area cities under the leadership of San Francisco community leader Edith M. Austin, it was Paul Cobb, political activist, running for Oakland City Council, who labeled the group Women Organized for Political Action.

BWOPA's founding member, former Oakland Vice Mayor and California State President Hon. Dezie Woods Jones reigns over eight (8) chapters throughout California today.  Surviving founding members of the 12 also include former Oakland School Board member Hon. Alfreda Abbott and renowned TV Journalist Belva Davis.   Founding members in memoriam are Margaret Amoureaux, Ruth Hagwood-Webb, Aileen Hernandez, Ella Hill Hutch, Mary Jane Johnson, Dorothy Pitts, Teola Sanders and Frances Taylor.  

Today BWOPA still asserts everything which affects the quality of life is in most ways political.  On this tenet, BWOPA’s primary goal is to educate, train, and involve as many African American women as possible in the political process.   

BWOPA's work is accomplished through our main organization BWOPA, our Training Institute for Leadership Enrichment (TILE), and our political action committee (PAC).  BWOPA commitment to addressing those core issues which adversely affect the African American community fall within the realm of Health, Education, Criminal Justice and Economic Security.

Interested in learning more about our 50th Anniversary celebratory events and serving as a partner, email staff@bwopa.org to request a sponsorship package.

BE A BWOPA GIRL:  It's BWOPA membership season and we welcome join one of our eight chapters.  CLICK HERE TO JOIN BWOPA Today!

Learn More About BWOPA!

 

 

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BWOPA Welcomes Solano/Napa Chapter

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NEW SOLANO/NAPA CHAPTER INTERIM OFFICERS INSTALLED w/ BWOPA State President Hon. Dezie Woods Jones & Regional Director Dr. Cassandra Joubert @Green Hive Spaces, Vallejo, CA with full house of over 50 black women who showed up and out!
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K. Patrice Williams, JD - President
Latressa Wilson-Alford - Vice President 
Danette Mitchell - Secretary
Peggy Cohen-Thompson - Political Education
Hon. Dezie Woods Jones - BWOPA State Board President
Cassandra Joubert, ScD - State Regional Director / State Board Health Policy Advisor
[ Not Shown ] - Shontell Beasley - Treasurer and Lynette Henley - Parliamentarian 

[ 2018 NEW PAID MEMBERS ] K. Patrice Williams, Latressa Wilson Alford, Janet Hubbard, Danette Mitchell, Vanessa Calloway, Lynette Henley, Jacqueline Jones, Elissa Stewart, Hon. Brenda Knight, Deborah Dickson, Hakeem Brown, Sheila Johnson, Elissa Stewart, Janet Hubbard, Verneal Brumfield, Nathell Glover Buford

[ 2018 LIFETIME MEMBERS ] Eileene Tejada, Jacqueline Jones, K. Patrice Williams

For more information on the Solano/Napa Chapter, contact patrice@brandgov.com and LIKE BWOPA Solano/Napa on Facebook!

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Let's Talk!

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Enjoyed an enlightening evening of Community Engagement at the "Let's Talk" event hosted by Black Women Organized for Political Action (BWOPA). Congratulations to the 2017 Cohort of BWOPA/TILE DWJ Fellows.

These beautiful young sistah's did an excellent job presenting policy recommendations on a range of social issues that disproportionately impact the Black community from CSEC; Small Business Dev; Infant Mortality; to the Justice System. Congrats and wishing them much success! #BlackWomenLead #DWJFellows #BWOPA #Congrats #GreatEvent

"Letitia Henderson" #BWOPA/TILE Let's Talk 2017

 

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CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION

 

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Author James Forman Jr.

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DWJ Fellows at Congresswoman Barbara Lee Political Forum with Congressman Keith Ellison and Van Jones

Saturday, June 24th at the Scottish Rite Temple in Oakland, Congresswoman Barbara Lee and Congressman Keith Ellison hosted a political forum moderated by Van Jones. 

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Van Jones, Congresswoman Barbara Lee, and Congressman Keith Ellison

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2017 DWJ Fellow Tyffanie Wedding and Van Jones 

 

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June's National Safety Month

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NATIONAL SAFETY MONTH
BLACK WOMEN PROMOTING PEACE & JUSTICE IN OUR COMMUNITY
by Danielle Nicole Motley
BWOPA/TILE DWJ Public Policy Fellow 2017
 
The month of June is generally recognized in this country as National Safety Month. Consequently, BWOPA/TILE's theme for the month of June is "Black Women Promoting Peace and Justice in our communities".  We are honored to have Ms. Danielle Nicole Motley, one of our 2017 DWJ Fellows, explain the way black women across the country, especially in the Bay Area have inspired and empowered her to continue the fight for peace and justice in our community.
 
"Were it not for Black women,
there would have been no one to fight for me and I would not be here to fight alongside you ..."
 - Alicia Garza, co-founder of Black Lives Matter
Exactly one year ago, I visited the Bay Area for the first time. After falling in love with its possibilities, its history, and of course, the weather, I ended my visit knowing for certain that I'd soon return to make this my home, which I did so just a few months later. Of all the things that inspire me about the Bay Area, being out on the front lines, fighting for peace and justice alongside other Black women, is at the top of my list.
 
Since moving here, I immediately started building my community and connecting with some of the Bay Area's most phenomenal women. In September, just a few days after I arrived, I joined Essie Justice Group in Sacramento to lobby for SB1157, a bill authored by Senator Holly Mitchell to protect in-person jail visits in California. After a day of lobbying, we had the opportunity to meet with Senator Mitchell in her office. We packed her space with women whose lives had intersected with the criminal justice system. Their sons, daughters, mothers, fathers, sisters, brothers, and husbands were living life behind bars. We were also joined by formerly incarcerated women who were now fighting for the comrades they left behind. Although, SB1157 was ultimately vetoed by Governor Brown, the energy and passion shared amongst the Senator and all the women who were there fighting for their loved ones that day is unforgettable. Since that visit, I've been following the work of Sen. Mitchell, all of her priorities for 2017 focuses solely on protections for youth, expanding mental health services and fostering environments for families and communities to thrive. Senator Mitchell continues to be a warrior for us all!
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The Status of Black Women in The United States

status_of_blk_wom_report_cover.jpgNational Domestic Workers Alliance's The Status of Black Women in The United States 

Black women are integral to the well-being of their families, their communities and the nation as a whole. Through their work, entrepreneurship, caregiving, political participation, and more, Black women are creating opportunities for themselves, their loved ones, and improving the our economy and society. They have all the makings of what should be success, yet their contributions are undervalued and under compensated. Black domestic workers are particularly vulnerable because of the ways in which racial disparities, gender discrimination, and immigration status serve to further marginalize and disempower the very people who power our economy and push our democracy to be the best that it can be. Whether one examines Black women’s access to healthcare, earnings, or access to much needed social supports like childcare and eldercare, Black women are getting the short end of the stick, despite having contributed so much to the building of this nation.

- READ FULL REPORT -

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